Dry Dredgers Guest Book

Please sign our guest book. Feel free to tell us a little about yourself - your interest in fossils, what brought you to this web site, or anything else we might want to know. Please keep the subject matter to fossils, the Dry Dredgers, or the drydredgers.org web site.

Thanks.
Bill Heimbrock, Webmaster

Dry Dredgers Guestbook





Comments:
Great information!

Added: June 22, 2017
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Comments:
Hi, this is a great, very helpful website. I have not collected for around 20 years, but I'm getting very interested to start hunting again. I love trilobites and crinoids the most, but everything interest me. I collected all my earlier fossils around Northern KY. off of 275 in hillcuts. My best finds are: 2 complete prone flexicalymene Meeki = one very fragile; 1/2 of an Isotelus; a 1/4 inch long nearly complete Primaspis; a complete Cryptolithus cephalon (minus the genal spines);
a colorful Rafinesquina; and 3 nice partial crinoid crowns -- My guess is Ectenocrinus. I plan to join the group. Thanks again for the great information on this site.


Added: May 28, 2017
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Hi! I'm new to fossils. I went to Minnesota to help the Burpee Museum of Nat. Hist. look for dino bones and other things a couple of summers ago. I loved it! All of my digging has been in the geology area--minerals, semi-precious and non-precious but pretty gems and garden rocks! My interest is in those field trips where I can dig, get dirty and meet fascinating people.

Added: May 1, 2017
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Comments:
Realy nice, thank you so much for all of this. hv.inga.peters@versanet.de

Added: March 4, 2017
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Comments:
no comment

Added: February 6, 2017
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Comments:
I am an amateur fossil hunter. I attended a couple Dry Dredgers meetings years ago. Very interesting information and people. I lived in Cincinnati then.

I Love trilobites, though I have never found one entirely intact. When the weather warms I plan to visit the cut in the hill on KY 68 leading to the new bridge between Maysville, KY and Aberdeen, OH. Perhaps I'll find one.


Added: January 15, 2017
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We visited family in Ohio last year and I was delighted to find fossils. While planning a trip for next May I had the great fortune to find your site.

I have found so much information here. Thank you!

Looking forward to visiting and finding tons of fossils next year.


Added: October 25, 2016
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Comments:
I'm in highschool, but looking at UofC's Geology program. I am currently a member (one of the youngest :D ) of a local Rockhound Club, and came across your site. Just wanted to say "Hi" and wondered if I went to college at Cincy, if I could attend your meetings too?

Admin reply: Certainly, Robert.
Students are welcome at all our meetings. You will learn a great deal that way. The meetings are open to the public and are held on the 4th Friday of the months of January, February, March, April, May, September, October and November.
You don't need to be a member to come to the meetings, but it helps a lot to pay your dues and receive a parking pass to park on the campus drives on those days.
Hope to see you there!
Bill Heimbrock, Webmaster, drydredgers.org


Added: October 16, 2016
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Comments:
Hello from the Phila. area. I am a DVPS member and interested in becoming a member of Dry Dredgers too. I have a son living in Cincinnati with his family and visit there occasionally. Looking forward to meeting some of you along the way. Have a stellar day!!! :o

Admin reply: Thanks for posting Cathy, and welcome to the Dry Dredgers. To join, download, print and mail with your dues the membership application form found at http://drydredgers.org/register.htm.
I hope we can go fossil hunting or share information at a Dry Dredgers meeting the next time you are in the Cincinnati area.
Best Wishes,
Bill Heimbrock
Webmaster, Drydredgers.org


Added: October 6, 2016
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Comments:
I have collected minerals and fossils since I was a child and since I am 58 that is quite more than a few decades. Due to work, school and other interests I have not been active in the hobby for trhe last 30 years.
I was in Cincinnati recently and I stopped on the beltway to gather some rocks bearing fossils. After climbing the formation, I looked directly adjacent to where I had parked and found an interesting piece. On the back of it, there was an obvious protuberance about 3/4" long.
My dilemma is trying to determine if it may be a trilobite or just a dead bug. don't laugh. I don't want to compromise te integrity of the "specimen in any way. It feels hard to the touch but I sense a little "give" when I press on certain areas but I speculated that this could be the remains of a chitinous exoskeleton. I have this darn thing for a month now and I am wondering if someone could help out?
I am 90% sure it is just a hardened dead bug but that 10% uncertainty is killing me :) My E-mail is tsoukup65@outlook.com and my phone is 443-900-5779,
Can someone please help ?

Admin reply: Hi Thomas.

Here is my suggestion. Separate your suspected trilobite from the slab with your hand only and brush as much of the mud and clay off of it as you can. Then let the clay/mud dry completely and brush it off if you can.

The reason for this method is that prone trilobites (stretched out, not enrolled) are fragile and will fall apart in standing water. Enrolled trilobites, on the other hand, are sturdy and can hold up to washing. If it feels enrolled, just wash it in water.

I hope you are able to visit the Cincinnati area more often. Fossil hunting is a lot of fun here.

Bill Heimbrock
webmaster, Dry Dredgers


Added: August 3, 2016
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